EmmaBond Gardner

A virtual repository for the bits and pieces of life I find interesting. These include (but certainly aren't limited to) digital media, NYC, history, southern culture and food, international affairs, sports, traveling to faraway lands, books, and women's rights. Even shorter musings can be found on Twitter at @EmmaBGardner.
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Publishing/advertising/media nerds, take a look at this new video about The Economist Group and GE’s “Look ahead” integrated content program. GE “Look ahead” lives on www.economist.com and features daily blog posts, infographics, slideshows, and videos on the innovations transforming global business.

I’m obviously a little biased, but it’s high-quality, super interesting content that showcases the best of The Economist Group and GE. Plus, it’s won a bunch of awards. Check it out. 

Poor history. It’s seen a steady decline being mentioned in Jeopardy clues. (From Time).

Perhaps the saddest line from the New York Times article on the groundbreaking report: “The study also shed light on why people get into sex work. Pimps and sex workers often said they were encouraged by their families to do so, and many cited poverty as a major factor in their decisions. About 30 percent of those interviewed said a family member was also involved in sex work.”

"I insist on not playing down my femininity" and other manifestos from a recent "Women in IT" Hangout I moderated

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Well researched and reasoned Economist piece on the failures of democracy — and what can be done to support it worldwide. Also take note of its beautiful web-friendly, multimedia layout:

"All this has demonstrated that building the institutions needed to sustain democracy is very slow work indeed, and has dispelled the once-popular notion that democracy will blossom rapidly and spontaneously once the seed is planted. Although democracy may be a “universal aspiration”, as Mr Bush and Tony Blair insisted, it is a culturally rooted practice. Western countries almost all extended the right to vote long after the establishment of sophisticated political systems, with powerful civil services and entrenched constitutional rights, in societies that cherished the notions of individual rights and independent judiciaries."

A bit of a wake-up call to see that an income of $12k a year is considered high in this very beautiful map of income levels around the world. (From National Geographic). 

An unforeseen effect of women’s equality in the US? These educated (=higher income) women marry educated (=higher income) men, concentrating wealth at the household level and increasing income inequality across the US. (From The Economist). 

Eerily beautiful map of deforestation around the world over the past decade (or so). From a new report by The Economist Intelligence Unit and the Rockefeller Foundation

Over it. 

Hot damn, California. (From Business Insider)

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There’s a great piece in Politico by Rebecca Burns about the actual causes of the Atlanta snowstorm fiasco. It’s not that Southerners can’t drive in snow. Instead, she argues, the traffic and safety nightmares resulted from a mix of suburban sprawl, a patchwork of local governments that don’t work together, poor public transit, and a lack of investment in forward-thinking public transit.These policy hurdles have been around for years, and they’e not going away anytime soon (a referendum to support transit improvement failed to pass the public’s muster in 2012). My hometown might need to get used to this. 

The EIU’s “Global Food Security Index" has been updated with Q4 numbers. The EIU found that food prices rose slightly at the end of 2013, decreasing food affordability in the majority of the 107 countries covered in the index. Not surprisingly, Syria and Sudan (North and South?) had the largest drop in food security, as political violence continues in both countries. 

You can play with the index here and see how food security, undernourishment and human development are all linked. 

Desperate for sun and warmth, I squeezed a stop at the beach into an <24-hour work trip to Florida.

Who needs women or non-Europeans anyway, amirite? The Economist breaks down who gets invited to Davos

Wow, I wonder why my illustrious college has a problem attracting and nurturing low-income students?